By Louise Hudson

What’s the magic formula for clearing cranial clutter, fighting fear, balancing breathing, fostering focus and having more fun while skiing? One answer is mountain mindfulness. And the mindful wintersports trend, which has been exploding across Europe for the past decade, is now infiltrating Canadian ski areas.

At Blue Mountain, Mindful Mondays have proved so popular with the High Park Ski Club over the past few seasons that organizer Peg McPhedran has added a Wednesday program (https://hpsc.ca/Skiing-with-Mindfulness). And this winter, Emily Gaus has launched Mindful Snowboarding there, too. “Applying mindfulness concepts to my riding has certainly helped. Frequently – in life on and off the mountain – I’ll get too in my head,” says Emily. “My mindfulness practice, which can be as simple as just focusing on the breath for a few moments before starting a run, is a good way to get out of my head and into my body.” Applying this technique to her teaching, Gaus regularly reminds her students to breathe properly, particularly when attempting new tricks or challenging runs.

Zen and the Art of Mountain Maintenance (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/zen-and-the-art-of-mountain-maintenance-tickets-40847460855) is a brand new daylong program at Mont-Tremblant, where local leadership coach and level 2 ski instructor, Caroline Thibaudeau is training skiers in overcoming terrain anxiety by creating a mind-body connection. “The magic about mindful skiing is that you learn to take fear as your lover, positively orientating your energy in the direction of your next turn, the next moment and the next hill,” she says. At classes based at the Westin Hotel and on the surrounding slopes, her students are gaining a deeper understanding of what is challenging them, increasing stability and well-being, and developing techniques for self-mastery. “Ever since I became a certified Leadership Coach with the In